Posts Tagged ‘trestles’

September 19th, 2013 | By | 1,870 Comments

Taj Wins the Hurley Pro Trestles

Taj Burrow won the Hurley Pro at Trestles in a hard-fought final over fellow Australian Julian Wilson at Lower Trestles. (more…)

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June 16th, 2013 | By | 2,019 Comments

Photo Tip of the Week: Shawn Parkin Follow The Light Winner Talks About Getting Weird With Zoom Lenses

 

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Dane Reynolds, Lower Trestles. Lens: 50mm

“For many photographers, including myself, zoom lenses allow us to achieve greater focal range, at a relatively low cost. Good glass doesn’t come cheap, so many photographers need to stretch their lens budget by buying zoom lenses. There’s nothing wrong with that. But the ability to zoom can sometimes lead to stale perspectives. It’s far too easy to sit in one spot, zoom in to get a tight shot, and then zoom out to get a wide shot. But far more important that moving your zoom ring, is moving your feet. These photographs of Jason Arnold (below) and Dane Reynolds (above) were shot with the same lens (50mm fixed), on the same day. Two completely different perspectives, achieved by moving closer, and farther away from the subject.” -Shawn Parkin

Try this:
-Grab a prime (fixed focal length) lens for a session, or if you don’t have access to one, then use your zoom lens, but keep it fixed on one focal length. This will force you to move your position.

-To get a wide shot, you’ll have to move back. To get a tight shot, you’ll have to move in close. This will change the perspective in your photographs, and when done right, will help to create more interesting angles.

-Keep in mind that moving around to find different angles doesn’t always mean standing on your feet. Lay down on the ground. Climb a tree. Get weird.

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August 2nd, 2012 | By | 4,465 Comments

Lower Trestles Raid 2012

The second annual Trestles Raid just went down, and the pack of San Clemente surf rats showed up in force. Led by Riley Metcalf aka “Captain Barbossa” and a crew twice the size as last year shredded in full costume with decorated  boards to boot. The always tense line-up at Lower Trestles only had a few eggy hard board hold-outs who fileted a couple crew members, but they successfully took over the wave and already antsy for the next ambush.

Viewer Discretion Advised

Success was owed to the boys at Catchsurf, who supplied heaps of Odysea Soft-tops, Beater boards, and some explicitly themed shapes. Beater Boy Johnny Redmond was in rare form, rocking the assless chaps and other “foreign objects” to match his uber phallic sled.

Catchsurf boards aren’t your boggy Wavestorm COSTCO board either. The lightweight performance of the Odysea lets you surf it like a shortboard without the thing flexing and flopping down the face. Made in San Clemente Ca, the CatchSurf boys have debunked the soft-top stigma since the beachbreaks are littered with this safe alternative when conditions aren’t optimal for your daily driver.

Check out the whole CatchSurf board here

May 4th, 2012 | By | 3,902 Comments

Lost Designs By Matt Biolos Lost Surfboards and designs stole the spotlight at lower trestles. Pure Mayhem

If you watched the Nike Lowers Pro webcast, you heard the heavy praise for the Lost Mayhem surfboard shaped by Matt Biolos. About 50% of the surfers competed with a some variation of this model and they’re psyching on the Mayhem’s high performance fit with the wave at lower trestles.

Biolos said he shaped around 100 Mayhem boards last week for the field of surfers from 18 different countries. He started shaping boards specifically for trestles since he graduated San Clemente Highschool in 1987, so the competing surfers wanted his expertise to gain the upper hand in the lowers shred fest.

The Lost brand celebrates the radical rejection of the status quo, which is exactly why the state of surfing lives above the lip today. Lost boards are shaped to push the limits of surfing, and Lost clothing is designed for the black sheep in the action sports world.

Lost designs originate from the surfboard art Matt used to airbrush on boards in the back of Herbie Flether’s shaping room. Lost products road tested and influenced by teamriders like the Fletchers, Lopezs, Hos, Beschens, Andinos and Wardo.

Checkout the whole new Lost line at SWELL here